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“NOTHING HAPPENS UNTIL SOMETHING MOVES”

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U.S. Army Pfc. Vicky Evans and Pfc. Daniel Zink, 393rd Transportation Harbormaster Operations Detachment, 11th Transportation  Battalion, conduct an operational test of the SIPR/NIPR satellite system at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Aug. 4, 2022. HCCC’s provide Coalition, Command, Control, Communications, Computing, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance capabilities through a suite of sensors, radars, and consoles; providing operational security and safe maritime logistics. (Photo by Abraham Essenmacher, Joint Base Langley-Eustis)

U.S. Army Pfc. Vicky Evans and Pfc. Daniel Zink, 393rd Transportation Harbormaster Operations Detachment, 11th Transportation Battalion, conduct an operational test of the SIPR/NIPR satellite system at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Aug. 4, 2022. HCCC’s provide Coalition, Command, Control, Communications, Computing, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance capabilities through a suite of sensors, radars, and consoles; providing operational security and safe maritime logistics. (Photo by Abraham Essenmacher, Joint Base Langley-Eustis)

393rd Transportation Harbormaster Operations Detachment trains to provide Maritime Security

Story by Abraham Essenmacher, Joint Base Langley-Eustis

August 12, 2022

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. – The U.S. Army’s 393rd Transportation Harbormaster Operations Detachment and the 11th Transportation Battalion at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, continually practice efficiency as a mobile Harbormaster Command and Control Center, to provide operational security and safe maritime sea lanes.

The detachment is one of three active duty units, with two at Fort Eustis and one in Hawaii. Each detachment operates modified Humvees, which provide Coalition, Command, Control, Communications, Computing, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance capabilities through a suite of sensors, radars, and consoles to operate them with.

U.S. Army veteran Ian Ives, who was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), lies in a Walter Reed hospital bed while recovering from wounds he got in combat on November, 2019, Joint Base Lewis-McChord. On the left of Ives is T.J. Oshie, a pro hockey player with the Washington Capitals, his favorite player, and on his right is his wife, Rebecca Ives. (Photo courtesy of Ian Ives)

U.S. Army veteran Ian Ives, who was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), lies in a Walter Reed hospital bed while recovering from wounds he got in combat on November, 2019, Joint Base Lewis-McChord. On the left of Ives is T.J. Oshie, a pro hockey player with the Washington Capitals, his favorite player, and on his right is his wife, Rebecca Ives. (Photo courtesy of Ian Ives)

The Valor of Combat Wounded Veterans

Story by Spc. Collin MacKown, 14th Public Affairs Detachment

August 3, 2022

FORT CARSON, Colo. – The 4th Infantry Division celebrates Purple Heart Day, Aug. 7, which recognizes the acts of meritorious service performed by Soldiers in combat. This earned them the Purple Heart Medal which was founded Aug. 7, 1782, by former Commander-in-Chief, Gen. George Washington.

The Purple Heart Medal is designed to commemorate acts of bravery, and to honor fallen Soldiers for their service to the United States. As stated on the United States Army Human Resources Command website, the Purple Heart Medal is presented to members of the Armed Forces who have been killed, wounded, or will die from their wounds. Over two million Soldiers have received the Purple Heart Medal throughout the Army, for their dedicated service to the United States. Many soldiers and veterans can agree that there is nothing like being in a combat zone. “It’s unlike anything I have ever encountered,” says Bill Redmond, who retired as a first lieutenant Vietnam veteran, who was assigned to the 4th Infantry Division. “It was hard to believe, and until you see all the horror and poverty, you don’t realize just how significant of an impact it has on your life.”

A Soldier from the 940th Movement Control Team scans for opposing forces from atop an M1109 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) with an M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) during a perimeter defense scenario at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, July 25, 2022. The scenario was one of many iterations and exercises that make up Warrior Exercise (WAREX) 782202, designed to enhance Soldier readiness and maintain a lethal fighting force by practicing Army Warrior Tasks and drills.  (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Raymond Boyington, 361st Theater Public Affairs Support Element)

A Soldier from the 940th Movement Control Team scans for opposing forces from atop an M1109 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) with an M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW) during a perimeter defense scenario at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, July 25, 2022. The scenario was one of many iterations and exercises that make up Warrior Exercise (WAREX) 782202, designed to enhance Soldier readiness and maintain a lethal fighting force by practicing Army Warrior Tasks and drills. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Raymond Boyington, 361st Theater Public Affairs Support Element)

Soldiers Share Their Experiences about WAREX 782202

Story by Sgt. 1st Class Raymond Boyington, 361st Theater Public Affairs Support Element

July 30, 2022

Blue skies dotted with fluffy clouds. Fields of green surrounded by groves of trees. Gentle breezes and the swaying of branches from time to time. A typical tranquil setting, suddenly interrupted by the cracks of unexpected gunfire in the distance.

Soldiers spring to action to defend the perimeters of their bases. They mount machine guns, aim their M4 carbines equipped with blank firing adapters toward the sound of danger, and shoot, move, and communicate intently during Warrior Exercise (WAREX) 782202 on Fort McCoy, Wisconsin.

WAREX serves as an annual training opportunity for many U.S. Army Reserve Soldiers. The training exercise works on practicing Army Warrior Tasks and drills, reinforcing skills that keep a Soldier ready to fight.

U.S. Army Reserve First Lieutenant Larry Subramanian of the 948th Transportation Company gives a safety demonstration to U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. Baimodou Drammeh of the 948th Transportation Company July 26, 2022, at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. This exercise is part of the annual WAREX in which Army Reserve units conduct joint training under the 78th Training Division. (Photo by Spc. Chase Fitzgerald, 326th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

U.S. Army Reserve First Lieutenant Larry Subramanian of the 948th Transportation Company gives a safety demonstration to U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. Baimodou Drammeh of the 948th Transportation Company July 26, 2022, at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin. This exercise is part of the annual WAREX in which Army Reserve units conduct joint training under the 78th Training Division. (Photo by Spc. Chase Fitzgerald, 326th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment )

Unsung Heroes

Story by Spc. Chase Fitzgerald, 326th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment

July 27, 2022

“A lot of times, we show the front lines, but we miss the perspective that to support the front lines, we need units like the 948th Transportation Company and 941st Transportation Company to make sure they get the resources they need to conduct their battlefield operations,” said U.S. Army Reserve First Lieutenant Larry Subramanian of the 948th Transportation Company.

Subramanian is currently serving as the officer in charge (OIC) for the central receiving and shipping point (CRSP) yard, tasked with accounting for and maintaining the vehicles requested and shipped to Fort McCoy for the annual Warrior Exercise (WAREX) training mission. Logistical tasks such as these often are overlooked, but they are critical to mission success.