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Photo By Senior Airman Patrick Sullivan | U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 17th Combat Support Sustainment Battalion and members of the U.S. Air Force's 773rd Logistics Readiness Squadron load vehicles onto rail lines at Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 22, 2024, ahead of Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center 24-2. In previous iterations of the exercise, most forces and vehicles would convoy the near 400-mile journey from JBER to Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Using rail allows for reduced risk in transiting the often-treacherous Interior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Patrick Sullivan)

Photo By Senior Airman Patrick Sullivan | U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to the 17th Combat Support Sustainment Battalion and members of the U.S. Air Force's 773rd Logistics Readiness Squadron load vehicles onto rail lines at Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson, Alaska, Jan. 22, 2024, ahead of Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center 24-2. In previous iterations of the exercise, most forces and vehicles would convoy the near 400-mile journey from JBER to Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Using rail allows for reduced risk in transiting the often-treacherous Interior. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Patrick Sullivan)

Enhancing military mobility through Arctic logistics

By Senior Airman Patrick Sullivan, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson Public Affairs

February 8, 2024

Units across Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson came together in a joint effort to coordinate rail operations for the first time to support Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Center 24-2, U.S. Army Alaska’s largest annual Arctic-readiness exercise.

Two rail lines were loaded with a variety of military transport vehicles Jan. 22 and 23, 2024, to be transported from JBER to Fort Wainwright for use in the exercise, which begins Feb. 8.

From left: Lt. Col. Steven Robinette, 58th Transportation Battalion commander; Brig. Gen. Beth Behn, Army Transportation Corps chief; and Capt. Kathleen Cylkowski, nurse practitioner and officer in charge of the battalion’s new U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Organic Medical Support facility, cut the ceremonial ribbon Feb. 6 in Bldg. 1621. TOMS facilities, as they're commonly called, provide essential examinations, vision screenings and simple medical procedures, and better integrate medical resources directly into the unit to better enhance readiness. (Photo by Melissa Buckley, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office)

From left: Lt. Col. Steven Robinette, 58th Transportation Battalion commander; Brig. Gen. Beth Behn, Army Transportation Corps chief; and Capt. Kathleen Cylkowski, nurse practitioner and officer in charge of the battalion’s new U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Organic Medical Support facility, cut the ceremonial ribbon Feb. 6 in Bldg. 1621. TOMS facilities, as they're commonly called, provide essential examinations, vision screenings and simple medical procedures, and better integrate medical resources directly into the unit to better enhance readiness. (Photo by Melissa Buckley, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office)

58th Transportation Battalion cuts ribbon for new medical facility

By Melissa Buckley, Fort Leonard Wood Public Affairs Office

February 8, 2024

FORT LEONARD WOOD, Mo. — The 58th Transportation Battalion hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony for their new U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Organic Medical Support facility Feb. 6 in Bldg. 1621.

The new TOMS facility, which it is commonly called, will integrate medical resources directly into the battalion. Its goal will be to provide more rapid care to members of the battalion than can typically be accomplished through medical facilities that service the entire installation — the idea being, the faster the battalion can get medical care to its population, the more efficient the unit can perform its mission.

Soldiers assigned to 8th Theater Sustainment Command, 25th Infantry Division, 599th Transportation Brigade, 402nd Army Field Support Brigade, Department of Defense Contractors, and elements from the U.S. Navy offload military vehicles as part of the Army Pre-positioned Stock 3 Fix-Forward (Afloat) from the U.S. Naval Ship Watson at Honolulu, Hawaii, Dec. 1, 2022. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Kyler Chatman)

Soldiers assigned to 8th Theater Sustainment Command, 25th Infantry Division, 599th Transportation Brigade, 402nd Army Field Support Brigade, Department of Defense Contractors, and elements from the U.S. Navy offload military vehicles as part of the Army Pre-positioned Stock 3 Fix-Forward (Afloat) from the U.S. Naval Ship Watson at Honolulu, Hawaii, Dec. 1, 2022. (Photo Credit: Sgt. Kyler Chatman)

Logistics in the Indo-Pacific: Setting the Theater for a Conflict over Taiwan

By Col. Gabriel W. Pryor

February 1, 2024

The likelihood of a U.S. military conflict with China over Taiwan in the next decade continues to increase. Over the past two decades of war in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. military has underinvested in critical strategic logistics and sustainment capabilities to deploy, fight, and win in the Indo-Pacific. In her February 2022 message to the force, Secretary of the Army Christine E. Wormuth stated, “We stand ready to deter and defend around the globe, as the tip of the spear in Europe and the backbone of the joint operations in the Indo-Pacific.” Examining the strategic deployment of forces during World War II is critical to understanding how the United States should invest in the future logistics and sustainment capabilities in the Indo-Pacific. This article argues that due to the contested environment in the Indo-Pacific, the United States requires increased forward presence, additional Army watercraft, and modernized Army pre-positioned stocks (APS) to deter or defeat a Chinese attack on Taiwan.

Cpl. Brandon McCray, a signal support systems specialist assigned to the 87th Division Sustainment Support Battalion, 3rd Division Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, sets up communications equipment during the National Training Center rotation 23-05 at Fort Irwin, California, March 2, 2023. (Staff Sgt. Jared T. Scott)

Cpl. Brandon McCray, a signal support systems specialist assigned to the 87th Division Sustainment Support Battalion, 3rd Division Sustainment Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, sets up communications equipment during the National Training Center rotation 23-05 at Fort Irwin, California, March 2, 2023. (Staff Sgt. Jared T. Scott)

Strategic Enabler’s Lens: Supporting LSCO in a Contested Environment

By Lt. Col. Michelle P. Santayana and Capt. Stephen Gowen

February 1,, 2024

As the Army organizes divisions and corps into formations supporting large-scale combat operations (LSCO) for the Army of 2030, sustainment operations with the right capability and capacity must be predictive and precise to support smaller and more dispersed units better. How logistics forces are formed, resourced, and trained for LSCO will shape the conditions for supporting the fight in contested environments and the response to conflict and competition in the multidomain operation sphere. This article explores the complexities of sustainment in a contested environment from the lens of a strategic enabler, provides insights on overcoming challenges based on lessons learned from an ammunition supply mission in the Middle Eastern country of Qatar, and offers actionable strategies for navigating through logistical obstacles with confidence.

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